A visit to Moncaro

Winemaker Giuliano D’Ignazi was very pleased to recieve us.

A couple of weeks ago I had the pleasure of travelling in the Marche region of Italy. Through out the trip we visited many interesting wineries, among them the Moncaro Coop, which as a matter of fact concluded the whole journey. I’m scarcely impressed by cooperatives since volumes tend to be far to large for achieving any stunts worth mentioning – out of the crooked fruit of bulk grapes, no straight wine was ever made. A paraphrase of legendary philosopher Immanuel Kant.

However not all hope is lost in this case as Moncaro has broad range of strings on their lute. The single vineyard wines do indeed impress, particularly the Castelli di Jesi Verdicchio DOCG Riserva Classico. A wine that even in it’s youth offer a superb combination of rich, slightly aromatic yellow fruit in combination with good chalky mineral, acidity and a well balanced alcohol. Definitely a wine to be taken seriously, though with regard to it’s perfect equilibrium it does not require any particular attention of the consumer. It just runs down along the palate and throat as the most silk-like tunes of a jazz quartet may enter your subconscious mind. Now don’t get me wrong, there is plenty to analyse, discover, scent and taste. My point is you can if you want to, but you don’t have to.

Beautiful Verdicchio

Also worth mentioning, is that it’s a wine at a very reasonable price, despite being the top range of Moncaro. Here, as in many other cases, the consumer benefit and the beauty of a cooperative is clear, as good value comes with a good price.

At the Moncaro winery there is also a very nice restaurant, Restaurant Erard, that I urge every traveller to visit. In a fine dining environment, superb seafood dishes are served in a fix lunch menu. Of course combined with the wines produced on sight, or perhaps with the local wineyeast infused beer. A handcraft specialty that is becoming more and more popular in wine producing regions including the Marche in Italy, though rarely exported. I can only hope that we’ll see some of it in this remote northern part of the world commonly known as Scandinavia. Until then I suppose I shall have to go back, a delightful thought in it self.

For more info on the wines please visit www.moncaro.com.

Andreas Kjörling, awarded author, photographer and sommelier

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